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Journal of Aging Research
Volume 2015, Article ID 267062, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/267062
Research Article

Genetic Risk Score Predicts Late-Life Cognitive Impairment

1Department of Psychology, University of Pittsburgh, Sennott Square, 3rd Floor, 210 South Bouquet Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15260, USA
2Center for the Neural Basis of Cognition, University of Pittsburgh, 4400 Fifth Avenue, Suite 115, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA
3Department of Neurology, University of Pittsburgh, 811 Kaufmann Medical Building, 3471 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA
4Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, Thomas Detre Hall, 3811 O’Hara Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA
5Division of General Internal Medicine and Geriatrics, Indiana University, Fifth Third Faculty Building, 720 Eskenazi Avenue, Indianapolis, IN 46202, USA

Received 2 April 2015; Revised 18 July 2015; Accepted 26 July 2015

Academic Editor: Elke Bromberg

Copyright © 2015 Mariegold E. Wollam et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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