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Journal of Aging Research
Volume 2018, Article ID 1208598, 8 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/1208598
Research Article

Self-Rated Health Trajectories among Married Americans: Do Disparities Persist over 20 Years?

1Division of Research and Modeling, Center for Financing, Access and Cost Trends, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20852, USA
2University of Nebraska-Lincoln, 709 Oldfather Hall, Lincoln, NE 68588-0324, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Terceira A. Berdahl; vog.shh.qrha@lhadreb.ariecret

Received 5 June 2017; Revised 27 October 2017; Accepted 22 November 2017; Published 11 January 2018

Academic Editor: F. R. Ferraro

Copyright © 2018 Terceira A. Berdahl and Julia McQuillan. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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