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Journal of Advanced Transportation
Volume 2018, Article ID 6873472, 11 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/6873472
Research Article

Switched Cooperative Driving Model towards Human Vehicle Copiloting Situation: A Cyberphysical Perspective

1Key Laboratory of Dependable Service Computing in Cyber Physical Society of Ministry of Education, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044, China
2School of Automation, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044, China
3China Automotive Engineering Research Institute Co., Ltd., Chongqing 401122, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Dihua Sun; moc.361@nus3d

Received 5 October 2017; Revised 31 December 2017; Accepted 15 January 2018; Published 27 February 2018

Academic Editor: Jose E. Naranjo

Copyright © 2018 Yang Li et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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