Table of Contents
Journal of Blood Transfusion
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 9316385, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/9316385
Research Article

Quantification of Cell-Free DNA in Red Blood Cell Units in Different Whole Blood Processing Methods

1Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada
2McMaster Centre for Transfusion Research, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada
3Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada
4Thrombosis and Atherosclerosis Research Institute, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada
5Centre for Innovation, Canadian Blood Services, Hamilton, ON, Canada
6Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada
7Centre for Innovation, Canadian Blood Services, Edmonton, AB, Canada

Received 11 August 2016; Accepted 7 September 2016

Academic Editor: Rajendra K. Chaudhary

Copyright © 2016 Andrew W. Shih et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Background. Whole blood donations in Canada are processed by either the red cell filtration (RCF) or whole blood filtration (WBF) methods, where leukoreduction is potentially delayed in WBF. Fresh WBF red blood cells (RBCs) have been associated with increased in-hospital mortality after transfusion. Cell-free DNA (cfDNA) is released by neutrophils prior to leukoreduction, degraded during RBC storage, and is associated with adverse patient outcomes. We explored cfDNA levels in RBCs prepared by RCF and WBF and different storage durations. Methods. Equal numbers of fresh (stored ≤14 days) and older RBCs were sampled. cfDNA was quantified by spectrophotometry and PicoGreen. Separate regression models determined the association with processing method and storage duration and their interaction on cfDNA. Results. cfDNA in 120 RBC units (73 RCF, 47 WBF) were measured. Using PicoGreen, WBF units overall had higher cfDNA than RCF units (); fresh WBF units had higher cfDNA than fresh RCF units (). Using spectrophotometry, fresh RBC units overall had higher cfDNA than older units (); fresh WBF RBCs had higher cfDNA than older RCF RBCs (). Conclusion. Higher cfDNA in fresh WBF was observed compared to older RCF blood. Further study is required for association with patient outcomes.