Journal of Cancer Epidemiology
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Acceptance rate17%
Submission to final decision81 days
Acceptance to publication32 days
CiteScore2.200
Impact Factor-
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Regional Variation of Pancreatic Cancer Incidence in the Nile Delta Region of Egypt over a Twelve-Year Period

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Journal of Cancer Epidemiology publishes studies related to population-based research on cancer etiology, prevention, surveillance, and survivorship and in the areas of descriptive, analytical, and molecular epidemiology etc.

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Research Article

Cervical Cancer Screening Service Utilization and Associated Factors among Women in the Shabadino District, Southern Ethiopia

Background. Cervical cancer is the major cause of morbidity and mortality among women worldwide with an estimated 528,000 new cases and 266,000 deaths annually. In Ethiopia, there are 7095 new cases and 4732 deaths of cervical cancer every year. But cervical cancer screening utilization remains limited. Therefore, the aim of the study was to assess cervical cancer screening utilization and associated factors among women in the Shabadino district, Southern Ethiopia. Methods. A community-based cross-sectional study was conducted in the Shabadino district, Southern Ethiopia, using a structured questionnaire. A systematic random sampling method was used to recruit 536 study participants. The collected data were entered and analyzed using SPSS version 22.0. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regressions were used to assess factors associated with cervical cancer screening utilization at a 95% level of significance and a value of less than 0.05. Results. The study revealed that among 506 women, only 52 (10.3%) have been screened for cervical cancer. Women who are educated (completed primary school and above) (; 95% -3.05), who have a history of the presence of sexually transmitted diseases (6; 95% -5.23), who have multiple sexual partners (; 95% -8.66), and who knew methods of cervical cancer prevention (; 95% -13.05) were significantly associated with high cervical cancer screening utilization. Conclusion. The magnitude of cervical cancer screening utilization among women was very low. Educational status, history of multiple sexual partners, history of sexually transmitted diseases, and knowing methods of prevention were significant factors of high cervical cancer screening utilization. Recommendation. It is very crucial to implement an appropriate awareness creation method. Additionally, the STI clinic should be linked to the cervical cancer screening service to increase the knowledge of cervical cancer prevention and the utilization of cervical cancer screening.

Research Article

Influence of Dose Intensity in Consolidation with HIDAC and Other Clinical and Biological Parameters in the Survival of AML

Background. The impact of the dose intensity administered in consolidation in Latin America is unknown. This study aimed to evaluate the relative dose intensity (RDI) in consolidation and its impact in overall survival. Methods. A retrospective study of 86 patients with AML who were diagnosed between 2010 and 2016 with a 2-year follow-up in a fourth-level Colombian hospital was carried out. Clinical characteristics were reported, Kaplan-Meier was used for estimating the overall survival, and Cox regression was used for multivariate analysis. Results. The median overall survival (OS) was 20.83 months, and the median event-free survival (EFS) was 16.83 months. 64.3% of the patients achieved remission after the chemotherapy induction treatment. Patients under 30 years of age, with white blood cell counts less than 100.000 cells/mm3 who responded to induction treatment had a better OS. Additionally, patients receiving an RDI greater than 0.75 of the planned consolidation dose had better survival. The prognostic variables with impact in the OS were the leukocyte count in peripheral blood at diagnosis, the RDI in consolidation treatment with HIDAC and the response obtained after induction. Conclusion. This retrospective study allowed us to know the epidemiology of AML in a reference Colombian Hospital. Additionally, in our knowledge, it is the first study that reports the RDI in consolidation with HIDAC in Latin America as a prognostic factor that directly impacts the OS.

Research Article

Intention to Screen for Cervical Cancer in Debre Berhan Town, Amhara Regional State, Ethiopia: Application of Theory of Planned Behavior

Background. Cervical cancer is a major public health problem in many developing countries. Despite the value of screening to prevent morbidity and mortality from cervical cancer, little available literature shows early detection and treatment to be limited in Ethiopia. The aim of this study was to determine the magnitude of and identify factors associated with women’s intention to screen for cervical cancer using the theory of planned behavior. Methods. A community-based cross-sectional study design supplemented with a qualitative approach was employed. Using multistage sampling, a total of 821 women were used in the study. An interviewer-administered survey questionnaire was used to collect quantitative data, whereas purposively selected 12 female health care providers were included in in-depth interviews. Descriptive statistics and simple and multiple binary logistic regression analysis were used to determine the magnitude of women’s intention, identify associated factors, and explore barriers for intention to cervical cancer screening among Debre Berhan women, Ethiopia. The statistical association was determined at a value of less than 0.05. Moreover, thematic analysis was used to search the hindrances of women’s intention to screen for cervical cancer. Results. The median age of women who participated in this study was 39 years with IQR of 35 to 42 years. Three hundred sixty-one (361, 45.3%) of women had an intention to screen for cervical cancer within three months from the date of the interview. Positive attitude towards cervical cancer screening (; 95% CI: 4.048, 9.387), positive subjective norm (; 95% CI: 1.342, 2.982), and higher perceived behavioral control (; 95% CI: 4.671, 10.807) were predictors of the women’s intention to screen for cervical cancer. The qualitative finding revealed that women did not like to be screened for cervical cancer because they thought that procedure pinch the cervix and it may result in perforating the uterus that would expose them for infertility. In addition, the qualitative findings supported quantitative results, where the constructs of the theory of planned behavior play an essential role in the betterment of women’s intention. Conclusion. This study showed that women’s intention to screen for cervical cancer was low. Positive attitudes towards cervical cancer screening (CCS), subjective norms, and perceived behavioral control were predictors of women’s intention to screen for cervical cancer. Thus, efforts should be exerted to improve the attitude of women involving influential people, which could improve women’s intention for cervical cancer screening. Moreover, behavioral change communication focusing on the constructs of the theory of planned behavior is crucial.

Research Article

The Epidemiology of Primary Central Nervous System Tumors at the National Neurologic Institute in Saudi Arabia: A Ten-Year Single-Institution Study

Objectives. This study is aimed at describing the epidemiological trends of primary CNS tumors in children and adults at the National Neurologic Institute in Saudi Arabia. Methods. A retrospective epidemiological approach was used where data was obtained from the department of pathology registry files and pathology reports. The records of all patients registered from January 2005 to December 2014 with a diagnosis of primary CNS tumor (brain and spinal cord) were selected. Data about sex, age, tumor location, and histologic type were collected. The classification was based on the International Classification of Diseases for Oncology, 3rd Edition (ICD-O-3). Results. Nine hundred and ninety-two (992) cases of primary CNS tumors throughout the ten years (2005 to 2014) were reviewed. There were 714 (71.97%) adults and 278 (28.02%) in the pediatric age group. Nonmalignant tumors dominated the adult population (60.08%) while malignant tumors were more frequent in the pediatric population. Gliomas constituted the most common neoplastic category in children and adults. The most common single tumor entity was meningioma (26.99%, ICD-O-3 histology codes 9530/0, 9539/1, and 9530/3). Medulloblastomas (ICD-O-3 histology codes 9470, 9471, and 9474) were the most common single tumor entity in the pediatric age group (26.62%). Conclusions. This is an institution-based, detailed, and descriptive epidemiological study of patients with primary CNS tumors in Saudi Arabia. In contrast to other regional and international studies, the medulloblastomas in our institution are more frequent than pilocytic astrocytomas. Limitations to our study included the referral bias and histology-based methodology.

Research Article

Increasing Incidence of Colorectal Cancer in Young Adults

Background. Colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence and mortality has been declining in the U.S. Despite success in reducing CRC incidence, incidence of early-onset CRC has increased markedly. In this study, we identified age-related disparities in CRC incidence and mortality, and investigated differences in anatomical distribution of colon cancers between populations. Methods. CRC trends were evaluated using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program Data from 1980–2016 for individuals under age 50 and 50 years and older. Rates and ratios were calculated using SEERStat. Regression analyses were calculated using Joinpoint. Results. Increased CRC incidence among individuals under age 50 was observed. Among individuals under age 50, incidence-based mortality (IBM) stabilized, while incidence and IBM decreased for individuals aged 50 years and older. Normalized trends indicated increased rectal cancer incidence for individuals under age 50, particularly among individuals aged 30–39. Similar incidence of proximal and distal colon cancers in individuals under age 50 was observed, while colon cancers in individuals aged 50 and older were primarily distal. Conclusions. We found age-related disparities in CRC incidence and IBM between individuals under age 50 and age 50 years and older. Increasing incidence rates of rectal cancer substantially accounts for this disparity among individuals under age 50. The escalating trends of early-onset CRC warrant investigation into the factors leading to the population-level trends.

Research Article

Development and Validation of an Algorithm to Identify Endometrial Adenocarcinoma in US Administrative Claims Data

Background. Endometrial adenocarcinoma is the most prevalent type of endometrial cancer. Diagnostic codes to identify endometrial adenocarcinoma in administrative databases, however, have not been validated. Objective. To develop and validate an algorithm for identifying the occurrence of endometrial adenocarcinoma in a health insurance claims database. Methods. To identify potential cases among women in the HealthCore Integrated Research Database (HIRD), published literature and medical consultation were used to develop an algorithm. The algorithm criteria were at least one inpatient diagnosis or at least two outpatient diagnoses of uterine cancer (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) 182.xx) between 1 January 2010 and 31 August 2014. Among women fulfilling these criteria, we obtained medical records and two clinical experts reviewed and adjudicated case status to determine a diagnosis. We then estimated the positive predictive value (PPV) of the algorithm. Results. The PPV estimate was 90.8% (95% CI 86.9–93.6), based on 330 potential cases of endometrial adenocarcinoma. Women who fulfilled the algorithm but who, after review of medical records, were found not to have endometrial adenocarcinoma, had diagnoses such as uterine sarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma of the uterus, endometrial stromal sarcoma, ovarian cancer, fallopian tube cancer, endometrial hyperplasia, leiomyosarcoma, or colon cancer. Conclusions. An algorithm comprising one inpatient or two outpatient ICD-9-CM diagnosis codes for endometrial adenocarcinoma had a high PPV. The results indicate that claims databases can be used to reliably identify cases of endometrial adenocarcinoma in studies seeking a high PPV.

Journal of Cancer Epidemiology
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate17%
Submission to final decision81 days
Acceptance to publication32 days
CiteScore2.200
Impact Factor-
 Submit

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