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Journal of Cancer Epidemiology
Volume 2012, Article ID 545062, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/545062
Research Article

Worry Is Good for Breast Cancer Screening: A Study of Female Relatives from the Ontario Site of the Breast Cancer Family Registry

1Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada M5T 3L9
2Prevention and Cancer Control, Cancer Care Ontario, Toronto, ON, Canada M5G 2L7
3Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada M5T 3M7
4Ontario Cancer Genetics Network, Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada M5G 1X5
5Maternal-Infant Care Research Centre, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada M5G 1X6
6Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada M5G 1A8
7School of Kinesiology and Health Sciences, York University, Toronto, ON, Canada M3J 1P3

Received 22 February 2012; Accepted 27 April 2012

Academic Editor: T. L. Vaughan

Copyright © 2012 Li Rita Zhang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Background. Few prospective studies have examined associations between breast cancer worry and screening behaviours in women with elevated breast cancer risks based on family history. Methods. This study included 901 high familial risk women, aged 23–71 years, from the Ontario site of the Breast Cancer Family Registry. Self-reported breast screening behaviours at year-one followup were compared between women at low (N=305), medium (N=433), and high (N=163) levels of baseline breast cancer worry using logistic regression. Nonlinear relationships were assessed using likelihood ratio tests. Results. A significant non-linear inverted “U” relationship was observed between breast cancer worry and mammography screening (P=0.034) for all women, where women at either low or high worry levels were less likely than those at medium to have a screening mammogram. A similar significant non-linear inverted “U” relationship was also found among all women and women at low familial risk for worry and screening clinical breast examinations (CBEs). Conclusions. Medium levels of cancer worries predicted higher rates of screening mammography and CBE among high-risk women.