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Journal of Cancer Epidemiology
Volume 2015, Article ID 179562, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/179562
Research Article

Traditional Dietary Pattern Increases Risk of Prostate Cancer in Argentina: Results of a Multilevel Modeling and Bias Analysis from a Case-Control Study

1Instituto de Investigaciones en Ciencias de la Salud, Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Haya de la Torre Esquina Enfermera Gordillo, Ciudad Universitaria, 5016 Córdoba, Argentina
2Escuela de Nutrición, Facultad de Ciencias Médicas, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Enrique Barros s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, 5016 Córdoba, Argentina
3Laboratorio di Epidemiologia e Biostatistica, Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico “Saverio de Bellis”, Via Turi 27, Castellana Grotte, 70013 Bari, Italy
4Cátedra de Biología Celular, Histología y Embriología, Facultad de Ciencias Médicas, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Haya de la Torre Esquina Enfermera Gordillo, Ciudad Universitaria, 5016 Córdoba, Argentina

Received 27 July 2015; Revised 16 October 2015; Accepted 25 October 2015

Academic Editor: Yun-Ling Zheng

Copyright © 2015 Camila Niclis et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

There is increasing evidence that dietary habits play a role in prostate cancer (PC) occurrence. Argentinean cancer risk studies require additional attention because of the singular dietary pattern of this population. A case-control study (147 PC cases, 300 controls) was conducted in Córdoba (Argentina) throughout 2008–2013. A principal component factor analysis was performed to identify dietary patterns. A mixed logistic regression model was applied, taking into account family history of cancer. Possible bias was evaluated by probabilistic bias analysis. Four dietary patterns were identified: Traditional (fatty red meats, offal, processed meat, starchy vegetables, added sugars and sweets, candies, fats, and vegetable oils), Prudent (nonstarchy vegetables, whole grains), Carbohydrate (sodas/juices and bakery products), and Cheese (cheeses). High adherence to the Traditional (OR 2.82, 95%CI: 1.569–5.099) and Carbohydrate Patterns (OR 2.14, 95%CI: 1.470–3.128) showed a promoting effect for PC, whereas the Prudent and Cheese Patterns were independent factors. PC occurrence was also associated with family history of PC. Bias adjusted ORs indicate that the validity of the present study is acceptable. High adherence to characteristic Argentinean dietary patterns was associated with increased PC risk. Our results incorporate original contributions to knowledge about scenarios in South American dietary patterns and PC occurrence.