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Journal of Cancer Epidemiology
Volume 2015, Article ID 842032, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/842032
Research Article

Cancer Mortality Pattern in Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Lagos, Nigeria

1Department of Anatomic and Molecular Pathology, College of Medicine, University of Lagos/Lagos University Teaching Hospital, PMB 12003, Lagos, Nigeria
2Department of Surgery, College of Medicine, University of Lagos/Lagos University Teaching Hospital, PMB 12003, Lagos, Nigeria

Received 31 July 2014; Revised 23 November 2014; Accepted 27 November 2014

Academic Editor: Yun-Ling Zheng

Copyright © 2015 Olakanmi Ralph Akinde et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Background. Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide and about 70% of all cancer deaths occurred in low- and middle-income countries. The cancer mortality pattern is quite different in Africa compared to other parts of the world. Extensive literature research showed little or no information about the overall deaths attributable to cancer in Nigeria. Aims and Objectives. This study aims at providing data on the patterns of cancer deaths in our center using the hospital and autopsy death registers. Methodology. Demographic, clinical data of patients who died of cancer were extracted from death registers in the wards and mortuary over a period of 14 years (2000–2013). Results. A total of 1436 (4.74%) cancer deaths out of 30287 deaths recorded during the period. The male to female ratio was 1 : 2.2 and the peak age of death was between 51 and 60 years. Overall, breast cancer was responsible for most of the deaths. Conclusion. The study shows that the cancers that accounted for majority of death occurred in organs that were accessible to screening procedures and not necessary for survival. We advise regular screening for precancerous lesions in these organs so as to reduce the mortality rate and burden of cancer.