Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Journal of Cancer Epidemiology
Volume 2017, Article ID 2705860, 25 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/2705860
Review Article

Relationships between Global DNA Methylation in Circulating White Blood Cells and Breast Cancer Risk Factors

1Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, School of Public Health and Health Sciences, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA, USA
2Department of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health and Health Sciences, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA, USA
3Department of Veterinary and Animal Science, College of Natural Sciences, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Nayha Chopra-Tandon; ude.ssamu@tarpohcn

Received 22 October 2016; Revised 26 February 2017; Accepted 14 March 2017; Published 6 April 2017

Academic Editor: Yun-Ling Zheng

Copyright © 2017 Nayha Chopra-Tandon et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. J.-Y. Choi, S. R. James, P. A. Link et al., “Association between global DNA hypomethylation in leukocytes and risk of breast cancer,” Carcinogenesis, vol. 30, no. 11, pp. 1889–1897, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  2. D. J. Weisenberger, M. Campan, T. I. Long et al., “Analysis of repetitive element DNA methylation by MethyLight,” Nucleic Acids Research, vol. 33, no. 21, pp. 6823–6836, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  3. J. Soares, A. E. Pinto, C. V. Cunha et al., “Global DNA hypomethylation in breast carcinoma: correlation with prognostic factors and tumor progression,” Cancer, vol. 85, no. 1, pp. 112–118, 1999. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  4. J. Bernardino, C. Roux, A. Almeida et al., “DNA hypomethylation in breast cancer: an independent parameter of tumor progression?” Cancer Genetics and Cytogenetics, vol. 97, no. 2, pp. 83–89, 1997. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  5. M. A. Gama-Sosa, V. A. Slagel, R. W. Trewyn et al., “The 5-methylcytosine content of DNA from human tumors,” Nucleic Acids Research, vol. 11, no. 19, pp. 6883–6894, 1983. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  6. K. Jackson, M. C. Yu, K. Arakawa et al., “DNA hypomethylation is prevalent even in low-grade breast cancers,” Cancer Biology and Therapy, vol. 3, no. 12, pp. 1225–1231, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  7. M. Esteller, M. F. Fraga, M. Guo et al., “DNA methylation patterns in hereditary human cancers mimic sporadic tumorigenesis,” Human Molecular Genetics, vol. 10, no. 26, pp. 3001–3007, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  8. L. A. DeRoo, S. C. E. Bolick, Z. Xu et al., “Global DNA methylation and one-carbon metabolism gene polymorphisms and the risk of breast cancer in the Sister Study,” Carcinogenesis, vol. 35, no. 2, pp. 333–338, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  9. K. Brennan, M. Garcia-Closas, N. Orr et al., “Intragenic ATM methylation in peripheral blood DNA as a biomarker of breast cancer risk,” Cancer Research, vol. 72, no. 9, pp. 2304–2313, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  10. H.-C. Wu, Q. Wang, H.-I. Yang, W.-Y. Tsai, C.-J. Chen, and R. M. Santella, “Global dna methylation levels in white blood cells as a biomarker for hepatocellular carcinoma risk: a nested case-control study,” Carcinogenesis, vol. 33, no. 7, pp. 1340–1345, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  11. X. Xu, M. D. Gammon, H. Hernandez-Vargas et al., “DNA methylation in peripheral blood measured by LUMA is associated with breast cancer in a population-based study,” The FASEB Journal, vol. 26, no. 6, pp. 2657–2666, 2012. View at Google Scholar
  12. Y. H. Cho, H. Yazici, H.-C. Wu et al., “Aberrant promoter hypermethylation and genomic hypomethylation in tumor, adjacent normal tissues and blood from breast cancer patients,” Anticancer Research, vol. 30, no. 7, pp. 2489–2496, 2010. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  13. M. Widschwendter, H. Fiegl, D. Egle et al., “Epigenetic stem cell signature in cancer,” Nature Genetics, vol. 39, no. 2, pp. 157–158, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  14. L. Delgado-Cruzata, H.-C. Wu, M. Perrin et al., “Global DNA methylation levels in white blood cell DNA from sisters discordant for breast cancer from the New York site of the breast cancer family registry,” Epigenetics, vol. 7, no. 8, pp. 868–874, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  15. A. Kuchiba, M. Iwasaki, H. Ono et al., “Global methylation levels in peripheral blood leukocyte DNA by LUMA and breast cancer: a case-control study in Japanese women,” British Journal of Cancer, vol. 110, no. 11, pp. 2765–2771, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  16. Q. Tang, J. Cheng, X. Cao, H. Surowy, and B. Burwinkel, “Blood-based DNA methylation as biomarker for breast cancer: a systematic review,” Clinical Epigenetics, vol. 8, no. 1, article 115, 2016. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  17. M. Garcia-Closas, F. J. Couch, S. Lindstrom et al., “Genome-wide association studies identify four ER negative-specific breast cancer risk loci,” Nature Genetics, vol. 45, no. 4, pp. 398e1–398e2, 2013. View at Google Scholar
  18. M. B. Terry, L. Delgado-Cruzata, N. Vin-Raviv, H. C. Wu, and R. M. Santella, “DNA methylation in white blood cells: association with risk factors in epidemiologic studies,” Epigenetics, vol. 6, no. 7, pp. 828–837, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  19. American Cancer Society, Breast Cancer Facts & Figures 2015-2016, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, Ga, USA, 2015.
  20. J. D. De Batlle, P. Ferrari, V. Chajes et al., “Dietary folate intake and breast cancer risk: European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition,” Journal of the National Cancer Institute, vol. 107, no. 1, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  21. A. Agodi, M. Barchitta, A. Quattrocchi et al., “Low fruit consumption and folate deficiency are associated with LINE-1 hypomethylation in women of a cancer-free population,” Genes and Nutrition, vol. 10, no. 5, article 30, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  22. V. Bollati, J. Schwartz, R. Wright et al., “Decline in genomic DNA methylation through aging in a cohort of elderly subjects,” Mechanisms of Ageing and Development, vol. 130, no. 4, pp. 234–239, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  23. K. Chalitchagorn, S. Shuangshoti, N. Hourpai et al., “Distinctive pattern of LINE-1 methylation level in normal tissues and the association with carcinogenesis,” Oncogene, vol. 23, no. 54, pp. 8841–8846, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  24. C. Duggan, L. Xiao, M. B. Terry, and A. McTiernan, “No effect of weight loss on LINE-1 methylation levels in peripheral blood leukocytes from postmenopausal overweight women,” Obesity, vol. 22, no. 9, pp. 2091–2096, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  25. O. El-Maarri, M. Walier, F. Behne et al., “Methylation at global LINE-1 repeats in human blood are affected by gender but not by age or natural hormone cycles,” PLoS ONE, vol. 6, no. 1, Article ID e16252, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  26. M. V. M. Gomes, L. V. Toffoli, D. W. Arruda et al., “Age-related changes in the global DNA methylation profile of leukocytes are linked to nutrition but are not associated with the MTHFR C677T genotype or to functional capacities,” PLoS ONE, vol. 7, no. 12, Article ID e52570, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  27. L. Hou, H. Wang, S. Sartori et al., “Blood leukocyte DNA hypomethylation and gastric cancer risk in a high-risk Polish population,” International Journal of Cancer, vol. 127, no. 8, pp. 1866–1874, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  28. D. T. Hsiung, C. J. Marsit, E. A. Houseman et al., “Global DNA methylation level in whole blood as a biomarker in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma,” Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention, vol. 16, no. 1, pp. 108–114, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  29. S. Karami, G. Andreotti, L. M. Liao et al., “Line1 methylation levels in pre-diagnostic leukocyte DNA and future renal cell carcinoma risk,” Epigenetics, vol. 10, no. 4, pp. 282–292, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  30. L. M. Liao, P. Brennan, D. M. van Bemmel et al., “Line-1 methylation levels in leukocyte DNA and risk of renal cell cancer,” PLoS ONE, vol. 6, no. 11, Article ID e27361, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  31. J. L. Marques-Rocha, F. I. Milagro, M. L. Mansego, D. M. Mourão, J. A. Martínez, and J. Bressan, “LINE-1 methylation is positively associated with healthier lifestyle but inversely related to body fat mass in healthy young individuals,” Epigenetics, vol. 11, no. 1, pp. 49–60, 2016. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  32. L. Mirabello, S. A. Savage, L. Korde, S. M. Gadalla, and M. H. Greene, “LINE-1 methylation is inherited in familial testicular cancer kindreds,” BMC Medical Genetics, vol. 11, article 77, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  33. M. S. Pearce, J. C. Mcconnell, C. Potter et al., “Global LINE-1 DNA methylation is associated with blood glycaemic and lipid profiles,” International Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 41, no. 1, pp. 210–217, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  34. W. Perng, E. Villamor, M. R. Shroff et al., “Dietary intake, plasma homocysteine, and repetitive element DNA methylation in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA),” Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases, vol. 24, no. 6, pp. 614–622, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  35. C. S. Wilhelm, K. T. Kelsey, R. Butler et al., “Implications of LINE1 methylation for bladder cancer risk in women,” Clinical Cancer Research, vol. 16, no. 5, pp. 1682–1689, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  36. F. F. Zhang, R. Cardarelli, J. Carroll et al., “Significant differences in global genomic DNA methylation by gender and race/ethnicity in peripheral blood,” Epigenetics, vol. 6, no. 5, pp. 623–629, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  37. F. F. Zhang, R. M. Santella, M. Wolff, M. A. Kappil, S. B. Markowitz, and A. Morabia, “White blood cell global methylation and IL-6 promoter methylation in association with diet and lifestyle risk factors in a cancer-free population,” Epigenetics, vol. 7, no. 6, pp. 606–614, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  38. Z.-Z. Zhu, L. Hou, V. Bollati et al., “Predictors of global methylation levels in blood DNA of healthy subjects: a combined analysis,” International Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 41, no. 1, pp. 126–139, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  39. M. F. Fraga, E. Ballestar, M. F. Paz et al., “Epigenetic differences arise during the lifetime of monozygotic twins,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 102, no. 30, pp. 10604–10609, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  40. K.-Y. Kim, D.-S. Kim, S.-K. Lee et al., “Association of low-dose exposure to persistent organic pollutants with global DNA hypomethylation in healthy Koreans,” Environmental Health Perspectives, vol. 118, no. 3, pp. 370–374, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  41. Y. K. Na, H. S. Hong, D. H. Lee, W. K. Lee, and D. S. Kim, “Effect of body mass index on global DNA methylation in healthy Korean women,” Molecules and Cells, vol. 37, no. 6, pp. 467–472, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  42. J. A. Rusiecki, A. Baccarelli, V. Bollati, L. Tarantini, L. E. Moore, and E. C. Bonefeld-Jorgensen, “Global DNA hypomethylation is associated with high serum-persistent organic pollutants in Greenlandic inuit,” Environmental Health Perspectives, vol. 116, no. 11, pp. 1547–1552, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  43. C. Fuke, M. Shimabukuro, A. Petronis et al., “Age related changes in 5-methylcytosine content in human peripheral leukocytes and placentas: An HPLC-based study,” Annals of Human Genetics, vol. 68, no. 3, pp. 196–204, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  44. L. E. Moore, R. M. Pfeiffer, C. Poscablo et al., “Genomic DNA hypomethylation as a biomarker for bladder cancer susceptibility in the Spanish bladder cancer study: a case-control study,” The Lancet Oncology, vol. 9, no. 4, pp. 359–366, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  45. G. Andreotti, S. Karami, R. M. Pfeiffer et al., “LINE1 methylation levels associated with increased bladder cancer risk in pre-diagnostic blood DNA among US (PLCO) and European (ATBC) cohort study participants,” Epigenetics, vol. 9, no. 3, pp. 404–415, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  46. H. L. Cash, L. Tao, J.-M. Yuan et al., “LINE-1 hypomethylation is associated with bladder cancer risk among nonsmoking Chinese,” International Journal of Cancer, vol. 130, no. 5, pp. 1151–1159, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  47. S. M. Tajuddin, A. F. S. Amaral, A. F. Fernández et al., “Genetic and non-genetic predictors of LINE-1 methylation in leukocyte DNA,” Environmental Health Perspectives, vol. 121, no. 6, pp. 650–656, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  48. O. El-Maarri, T. Becker, J. Junen et al., “Gender specific differences in levels of DNA methylation at selected loci from human total blood: a tendency toward higher methylation levels in males,” Human Genetics, vol. 122, no. 5, pp. 505–514, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  49. A. J. White, D. P. Sandler, S. C. E. Bolick, Z. Xu, J. A. Taylor, and L. A. Deroo, “Recreational and household physical activity at different time points and DNA global methylation,” European Journal of Cancer, vol. 49, no. 9, pp. 2199–2206, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  50. F. F. Zhang, R. Cardarelli, J. Carroll et al., “Physical activity and global genomic DNA methylation in a cancer-free population,” Epigenetics, vol. 6, no. 3, pp. 293–299, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  51. G. M. Martín-Núñez, R. Cabrera-Mulero, E. Rubio-Martín et al., “Methylation levels of the SCD1 gene promoter and LINE-1 repeat region are associated with weight change: an intervention study,” Molecular Nutrition and Food Research, vol. 58, no. 7, pp. 1528–1536, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  52. S. Bae, C. M. Ulrich, L. B. Bailey et al., “Impact of folic acid fortification on global DNA methylation and one-carbon biomarkers in the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study cohort,” Epigenetics, vol. 9, no. 3, pp. 396–403, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  53. K. B. Michels, H. R. Harris, and L. Barault, “Birthweight, maternal weight trajectories and global DNA methylation of LINE-1 repetitive elements,” PLoS ONE, vol. 6, no. 9, Article ID e25254, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  54. L. Delgado-Cruzata, H.-C. Wu, Y. Liao, R. M. Santella, and M. B. Terry, “Differences in DNA methylation by extent of breast cancer family history in unaffected women,” Epigenetics, vol. 9, no. 2, pp. 243–248, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  55. H.-C. Wu, E. M. John, J. S. Ferris et al., “Global DNA methylation levels in girls with and without a family history of breast cancer,” Epigenetics, vol. 6, no. 1, pp. 29–33, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  56. M. Iwasaki, H. Ono, A. Kuchiba et al., “Association of postmenopausal endogenous sex hormones with global methylation level of leukocyte DNA among Japanese women,” BMC Cancer, vol. 12, article 323, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  57. C. M. Ulrich, A. T. Toriola, L. M. Koepl et al., “Metabolic, hormonal and immunological associations with global DNA methylation among postmenopausal women,” Epigenetics, vol. 7, no. 9, pp. 1020–1028, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  58. H.-C. Wu, L. Delgado-Cruzata, J. D. Flom et al., “Global methylation profles in DNA from different blood cell types,” Epigenetics, vol. 6, no. 1, pp. 76–85, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  59. M. García-Closas, M. H. Gail, K. T. Kelsey, and R. G. Ziegler, “Searching for blood DNA methylation markers of breast cancer risk and early detection,” Journal of the National Cancer Institute, vol. 105, no. 10, pp. 678–680, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus