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Journal of Chemistry
Volume 2013, Article ID 951951, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/951951
Research Article

Bhanupaka: A Green Process in the Preparation of an Indian Ayurvedic Medicine, Lauha Bhasma

1School of Chemical & Biotechnology, SASTRA University, Thanjavur , Tamil Nadu 613 401, India
2Centre for Advanced Research in Indian System of Medicine, SASTRA University, Thanjavur, Tamil Nadu 613 401, India
3Centre for Nanotechnology & Advanced Biomaterials, SASTRA University, Thanjavur, Tamil Nadu 613 401, India

Received 30 June 2012; Revised 21 December 2012; Accepted 22 December 2012

Academic Editor: Lorenzo Cerretani

Copyright © 2013 Balaji Krishnamachary et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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