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Journal of Chemistry
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 524056, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/524056
Research Article

Amidine Sulfonamides and Benzene Sulfonamides: Synthesis and Their Biological Evaluation

1Institute of Chemistry, University of Punjab, Lahore 54590, Pakistan
2Institute of Biochemistry & Biotechnology, University of the Punjab, Lahore 54590, Pakistan

Received 21 May 2015; Accepted 2 July 2015

Academic Editor: Deniz Ekinci

Copyright © 2015 Muhammad Abdul Qadir et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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