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Journal of Chemistry
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 1936516, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/1936516
Research Article

Hydrogen Peroxide Treatment and the Phenylpropanoid Pathway Precursors Feeding Improve Phenolics and Antioxidant Capacity of Quinoa Sprouts via an Induction of L-Tyrosine and L-Phenylalanine Ammonia-Lyases Activities

Department of Biochemistry and Food Chemistry, University of Life Sciences, Skromna Street 8, 20-704 Lublin, Poland

Received 29 September 2015; Revised 15 February 2016; Accepted 23 February 2016

Academic Editor: Isabel Lara

Copyright © 2016 Michał Świeca. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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