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Journal of Chemistry
Volume 2017, Article ID 4035626, 7 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/4035626
Review Article

Melittin, a Potential Natural Toxin of Crude Bee Venom: Probable Future Arsenal in the Treatment of Diabetes Mellitus

1Laboratory of Preventive and Integrative Biomedicine, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Jahangirnagar University, Savar, Dhaka 1342, Bangladesh
2Human Genome Centre, School of Medical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 16150 Kubang Kerian, Kelantan, Malaysia

Correspondence should be addressed to Siew Hua Gan; ym.msu@naghs and Md. Ibrahim Khalil; moc.liamg@lilahkimrd

Received 29 March 2017; Revised 8 June 2017; Accepted 14 June 2017; Published 12 July 2017

Academic Editor: Sevgi Kolaylı

Copyright © 2017 Md. Sakib Hossen et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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