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Journal of Chemistry
Volume 2018, Article ID 1402674, 9 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/1402674
Research Article

Levels and Health Risk Assessment of Heavy Metals in Soil, Water, and Vegetables of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

1Department of Biological Sciences, Dar es Salaam University College of Education, P.O. Box 2329, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
2Department of Chemistry, Dar es Salaam University College of Education, P.O. Box 2329, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

Correspondence should be addressed to David Sylvester Kacholi; moc.oohay@87ilohcak

Received 18 October 2017; Accepted 4 January 2018; Published 31 January 2018

Academic Editor: Qizhen Du

Copyright © 2018 David Sylvester Kacholi and Minati Sahu. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

This study assesses heavy metals’ levels in water, soil, and vegetables (Ipomoea batatas (Matembele), Amaranthus hybridus (Mchicha), Abelmoschus esculentus (Bamia), and Solanum melongena (Bilinganya)) from the Chang’ombe police garden located in Temeke district, Tanzania. Also, it examines potential health risks from consumption of the vegetables. The samples of soils, water, and vegetables were randomly collected, processed, and analyzed for heavy metals using Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry. The heavy metals’ levels in soil, water, and vegetables were in the order of Fe > Zn > Pb > Cu. Among the vegetables, I. batatas had highest heavy metal content followed by A. hybridus, S. melongena, and A. esculentus. The average daily intake for Pb (63 mg/person/day) was above the permissible maximum tolerable daily intake of 0.21 mg/person/day endorsed by WHO/FAO. Hazard quotient of Pb for I. batatas (7.12) and A. hybridus (2.46) as well as the hazard indices of I. batatas (7.99) and A. hybridus (2.88) exceeded unity, signifying presence of health risks from consumption of the vegetables. This study recommends regular monitoring of heavy metals in soils, water, and foodstuffs to prevent excessive accrual in food chain.