Journal of Diabetes Research

Journal of Diabetes Research / 2007 / Article

Research Article | Open Access

Volume 2007 |Article ID 72741 | 8 pages | https://doi.org/10.1155/2007/72741

Effect of L-Carnitine on Skeletal Muscle Lipids and Oxidative Stress in Rats Fed High-Fructose Diet

Academic Editor: Rodica Pop-Busui
Received12 Jul 2006
Revised29 Oct 2006
Accepted09 Jan 2007
Published05 Apr 2007

Abstract

There is evidence that high-fructose diet induces insulin resistance, alterations in lipid metabolism, and oxidative stress in rat tissues. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of L-carnitine (CAR) on lipid accumulation and peroxidative damage in skeletal muscle of rats fed high-fructose diet. Fructose-fed animals (60 g/100 g diet) displayed decreased glucose/insulin (G/I) ratio and insulin sensitivity index (ISI0,120) indicating the development of insulin resistance. Rats showed alterations in the levels of triglycerides, free fatty acids, cholesterol, and phospholipids in skeletal muscle. The condition was associated with oxidative stress as evidenced by the accumulation of lipid peroxidation products, protein carbonyls, and aldehydes along with depletion of both enzymic and nonenzymic antioxidants. Simultaneous intraperitoneal administration of CAR (300 mg/kg/day) to fructose-fed rats alleviated the effects of fructose. These rats showed near-normal levels of the parameters studied. The effects of CAR in this model suggest that CAR supplementation may have some benefits in patients suffering from insulin resistance.

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Copyright © 2007 Panchamoorthy Rajasekar and Carani Venkatraman Anuradha. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


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