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Experimental Diabetes Research
Volume 2009, Article ID 429593, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2009/429593
Clinical Study

A Variation in the Cerebroside Sulfotransferase Gene Is Linked to Exercise-Modified Insulin Resistance and to Type 2 Diabetes

1Bartholin Institute, Rigshospitalet, Ole Maaløvsvej 5, 2200 Copenhagen, Denmark
2Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Mölndal, 413 45 Gothenburg, Sweden
3Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, 214 01 Malmo, Sweden
4Department of Public Health and Community Medicine/Primary Health Care, The Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University, 405 30 Gothenburg, Sweden

Received 9 March 2009; Accepted 18 May 2009

Academic Editor: Anjan Kowluru

Copyright © 2009 A. Roeske-Nielsen et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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