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Experimental Diabetes Research
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 560864, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/560864
Clinical Study

Oxytocin and Psychological Factors Affecting Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

11st Department of Psychiatry, Eginition Hospital, Athens University Medical School, 11528 Athens, Greece
2University Mental Health Research Institute, 11527 Athens, Greece
32nd Department of Internal Medicine, Research Institute and Diabetes Center, Athens University Medical School, Attikon University Hospital, 12462 Athens, Greece
4Hellenic National Center for Research, Prevention and Treatment of Diabetes Mellitus and Its Complications (HNDC), Athens, Greece

Received 24 March 2012; Revised 29 June 2012; Accepted 12 July 2012

Academic Editor: Bernard Portha

Copyright © 2012 K. Kontoangelos et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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