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Experimental Diabetes Research
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 824305, 19 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/824305
Review Article

Obesity and Appetite Control

Section of Investigative Medicine, Imperial College London, Commonwealth Building, Du Cane Road, London W12 0NN, UK

Received 15 March 2012; Accepted 20 June 2012

Academic Editor: Bernard Thorens

Copyright © 2012 Keisuke Suzuki et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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