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Journal of Diabetes Research
Volume 2013, Article ID 173783, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/173783
Review Article

MicroRNA in Diabetic Nephropathy: Renin Angiotensin, AGE/RAGE, and Oxidative Stress Pathway

1JDRF Danielle Alberti Memorial Centre for Diabetes Complications, Diabetes Division, Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute, 75 Commercial Road, Melbourne, VIC 3004, Australia
2Division of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Juntendo University, Tokyo 113-8421, Japan

Received 7 October 2013; Accepted 14 November 2013

Academic Editor: Tomohito Gohda

Copyright © 2013 Shinji Hagiwara et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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