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Journal of Diabetes Research
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 650694, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/650694
Research Article

Skin Autofluorescence Relates to Soluble Receptor for Advanced Glycation End-Products and Albuminuria in Diabetes Mellitus

1Institute of Medical Biochemistry and Laboratory Diagnostics, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, General University Hospital in Prague, 128 08 Prague 2, Czech Republic
23rd Department of Internal Medicine, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, General University Hospital in Prague, 128 08 Prague 2, Czech Republic
3Department of Internal Medicine, Ayos District Hospital, Yaounde, Cameroon

Received 21 December 2012; Revised 12 February 2013; Accepted 14 February 2013

Academic Editor: Mark A. Yorek

Copyright © 2013 J. Škrha Jr. et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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