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Journal of Diabetes Research
Volume 2013, Article ID 834727, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/834727
Review Article

Making Sense in Antisense: Therapeutic Potential of Noncoding RNAs in Diabetes-Induced Vascular Dysfunction

Atherosclerosis Research Unit, Department of Medicine, Center for Molecular Medicine (CMM L8), Karolinska Institute, 17176 Stockholm, Sweden

Received 3 October 2013; Accepted 26 October 2013

Academic Editor: Hanrui Zhang

Copyright © 2013 Suzanne M. Eken et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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