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Journal of Diabetes Research
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 763936, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/763936
Research Article

Targets and Candidate Agents for Type 2 Diabetes Treatment with Computational Bioinformatics Approach

Department of Endocrinology, Henan Provincial People’s Hospital, No. 7 Weiwu Road, Zhengzhou 450003, China

Received 10 February 2014; Accepted 3 September 2014; Published 21 October 2014

Academic Editor: Bernard Portha

Copyright © 2014 Qiong Wang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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