Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Journal of Diabetes Research
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 191595, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/191595
Research Article

High-Intensity Interval Training as an Efficacious Alternative to Moderate-Intensity Continuous Training for Adults with Prediabetes

1School of Health and Exercise Sciences, University of British Columbia, Okanagan Campus, 3333 University Way, Kelowna, BC, Canada V1V 1V7
2School of Kinesiology, University of British Columbia, 210-6081 University Boulevard, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 1Z1

Received 18 October 2014; Accepted 15 February 2015

Academic Editor: Hiroshi Okamoto

Copyright © 2015 Mary E. Jung et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. A. G. Tabák, C. Herder, W. Rathmann, E. J. Brunner, and M. Kivimäki, “Prediabetes: a high-risk state for diabetes development,” The Lancet, vol. 379, no. 9833, pp. 2279–2290, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  2. S. R. Colberg, R. J. Sigal, B. Fernhall et al., “Exercise and type 2 diabetes: the American College of Sports Medicine and the American Diabetes Association: joint position statement,” Diabetes Care, vol. 33, no. 12, pp. e147–e167, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  3. W. C. Knowler, E. Barrett-Connor, S. E. Fowler et al., “Reduction in the incidence of type 2 diabetes with lifestyle intervention or metformin,” The New England Journal of Medicine, vol. 346, no. 6, pp. 393–403, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  4. Physical Activity Guidelines Advisory Committee, Physical Activity Guidelines Advisory Committee Report, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Washington, DC, USA, 2008, http://www.health.gov/paguidelines/report/pdf/CommitteeReport.pdf.
  5. Department of Health, Start Active, Stay Active. A Report on Physical Activity for Health from the Four Home Countries' Chief Medical Officers, Department of Health, London, UK, 2011, https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/start-active-stay-active-a-report-on-physical-activity-from-the-four-home-countries-chief-medical-officers.
  6. Canadian Society of Exercise Physiology, Canada's Physical Activity Guidelines, Canadian Society of Exercise Physiology, Ottawa, Canada, 2011, http://www.csep.ca/guidelines.
  7. R. P. Troiano, D. Berrigan, K. W. Dodd, L. C. Mâsse, T. Tilert, and M. Mcdowell, “Physical activity in the United States measured by accelerometer,” Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, vol. 40, no. 1, pp. 181–188, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  8. Health and Social Care Information Centre, Health Survey for England—2008: Physical Activity and Fitness, The Information Centre, Leeds, UK, 2009, http://www.hscic.gov.uk/pubs/hse08physicalactivity.
  9. R. C. Colley, D. Garriguet, I. Janssen, C. L. Craig, J. Clarke, and M. S. Tremblay, “Physical activity of canadian children and youth: accelerometer results from the 2007 to 2009 canadian health measures survey,” Health Reports, vol. 22, no. 1, pp. 15–23, 2011. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  10. U. Wisløff, Ø. Ellingsen, and O. J. Kemi, “High-intensity interval training to maximize cardiac benefits of exercise training?” Exercise and Sport Sciences Reviews, vol. 37, no. 3, pp. 139–146, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  11. A. E. Tjønna, T. O. Stølen, A. Bye et al., “Aerobic interval training reduces cardiovascular risk factors more than a multitreatment approach in overweight adolescents,” Clinical Science, vol. 116, no. 4, pp. 317–326, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  12. J. P. Little, J. B. Gillen, M. E. Percival et al., “Low-volume high-intensity interval training reduces hyperglycemia and increases muscle mitochondrial capacity in patients with type 2 diabetes,” Journal of Applied Physiology, vol. 111, no. 6, pp. 1554–1560, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  13. J. P. Little, M. E. Jung, A. E. Wright, W. Wright, and R. J. F. Manders, “Effects of high-intensity interval exercise versus continuous moderate-intensity exercise on postprandial glycemic control assessed by continuous glucose monitoring in obese adults,” Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, vol. 39, no. 7, pp. 835–841, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  14. M. E. Francois, J. C. Baldi, P. J. Manning et al., “Exercise snacks' before meals: a novel strategy to improve glycaemic control in individuals with insulin resistance,” Diabetologia, vol. 57, no. 7, pp. 1437–1445, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  15. J. B. Gillen, J. P. Little, Z. Punthakee, M. A. Tarnopolsky, M. C. Riddell, and M. J. Gibala, “Acute high-intensity interval exercise reduces the postprandial glucose response and prevalence of hyperglycaemia in patients with type 2 diabetes,” Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism, vol. 14, no. 6, pp. 575–577, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  16. H. S. Kessler, S. B. Sisson, and K. R. Short, “The potential for high-intensity interval training to reduce cardiometabolic disease risk,” Sports Medicine, vol. 42, no. 6, pp. 489–509, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  17. K. S. Weston, U. Wisløff, and J. Coombes, “High-intensity interval training in patients with lifestyle-induced cardiometabolic disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis,” British Journal of Sports Medicine, vol. 48, pp. 1227–1234, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  18. M. J. Gibala, J. P. Little, M. J. Macdonald, and J. A. Hawley, “Physiological adaptations to low-volume, high-intensity interval training in health and disease,” The Journal of Physiology, vol. 590, no. 5, pp. 1077–1084, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  19. I. Janssen and R. Ross, “Vigorous intensity physical activity is related to the metabolic syndrome independent of the physical activity dose,” International Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 41, no. 4, Article ID dys038, pp. 1132–1140, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  20. S. G. Trost, N. Owen, A. E. Bauman, J. F. Sallis, and W. Brown, “Correlates of adults' participation in physical activity: review and update,” Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, vol. 34, no. 12, pp. 1996–2001, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  21. P. Ekkekakis, G. Parfitt, and S. J. Petruzzello, “The pleasure and displeasure people feel when they exercise at different intensities: decennial update and progress towards a tripartite rationale for exercise intensity prescription,” Sports Medicine, vol. 41, no. 8, pp. 641–671, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  22. American College of Sports Medicine, ACSM's Guidelines for Exercise Testing and Prescription, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Philadelphia, Pa, USA, 9th edition, 2010.
  23. M. E. Jung, J. E. Bourne, J. P. Little, and R. L. Newton, “Where does HIT fit? An examination of the affective response to high-intensity intervals in comparison to continous moderate- and continuous vigorous-intensity exercise in the exercise intensity-affect continuum,” PLoS ONE, vol. 9, no. 12, Article ID e114541, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  24. American Diabetes Association, “Diagnosis and classification of diabetes mellitus,” Diabetes Care, vol. 35, supplement 1, pp. S64–S71, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  25. Public Health Agency of Canada, CANRISK: The Canadian Diabetes Risk Questionnaire User Guide for Pharmacists, Public Health Agency of Canada, Ottawa, Canada, 2011, http://www.healthycanadians.gc.ca/health-sante/disease-maladie/diabetes-diabete/canrisk/index-eng.php.
  26. D. E. R. Warburton, V. K. Jamnik, S. S. D. Bredin, and N. Gledhill, “The physical activity readiness questionnaire (PAR-Q+) and electronic physical activity readiness medication examination (ePARmed-X+),” Health & Fitness Journal of Canada, vol. 4, no. 2, pp. 3–23, 2011. View at Google Scholar
  27. A. Bandura, Social Foundations of Thought and Action: A Social Cognitive Theory, Prentice Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ, USA, 1986.
  28. G. Borg, Borg's Perceived Exertion and Pain Scales, Human Kinetics, Champaign, Ill, USA, 1998.
  29. A. C. King, W. L. Haskell, D. R. Young, R. K. Oka, and M. L. Stefanick, “Long-term effects of varying intensities and formats of physical activity on participation rates, fitness, and lipoproteins in men and women aged 50 to 65 years,” Circulation, vol. 91, no. 10, pp. 2596–2604, 1995. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  30. L. Choi, Z. Liu, C. E. Matthews, and M. S. Buchowski, “Validation of accelerometer wear and nonwear time classification algorithm,” Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, vol. 43, no. 2, pp. 357–364, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  31. P. S. Freedson, E. Melanson, and J. Sirard, “Calibration of the computer science and applications, Inc. accelerometer,” Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, vol. 30, no. 5, pp. 777–781, 1998. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  32. N. L. Glazer, A. Lyass, D. W. Esliger et al., “Sustained and shorter bouts of physical activity are related to cardiovascular health,” Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, vol. 45, no. 1, pp. 109–115, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  33. T. L. Hart, A. M. Swartz, S. E. Cashin, and S. J. Strath, “How many days of monitoring predict physical activity and sedentary behaviour in older adults?” International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, vol. 8, article 62, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  34. A. G. Bertoni, N. D. Wong, S. Shea et al., “Insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, and subclinical atherosclerosis: the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA),” Diabetes Care, vol. 30, no. 11, pp. 2951–2956, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  35. Canadian Hypertension Education Program, The 2014 Canadian Hypertension Education Program Recommendations, Canadian Hypertension Education Program, Ontario, Canada, 2014, http://www.hypertension.ca/images/CHEP_2014/.
  36. M. J. Armstrong, B.-J. Martin, R. Arena et al., “Patients with diabetes in cardiac rehabilitation: attendance and exercise capacity,” Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, vol. 46, no. 5, pp. 845–850, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  37. C. Earnest, “The role of exercise interval training in treating cardiovascular disease risk factors,” Current Cardiovascular Risk Reports, vol. 3, no. 4, pp. 296–301, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  38. C. E. Garber, B. Blissmer, M. R. Deschenes et al., “Quantity and quality of exercise for developing and maintaining cardiorespiratory, musculoskeletal, and neuromotor fitness in apparently healthy adults: guidance for prescribing exercise,” Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, vol. 43, no. 7, pp. 1334–1359, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  39. M. F. F. Mediano, V. L. M. Pinto, F. D. S. N. S. Mendes, G. M. S. Silva, and A. S. Sousa, “Vigorous exercise in clinical practice: balancing risks and benefits,” Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, vol. 46, no. 5, p. 1053, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus