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Journal of Diabetes Research
Volume 2015, Article ID 436879, 17 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/436879
Review Article

Epigenetic Changes in Endothelial Progenitors as a Possible Cellular Basis for Glycemic Memory in Diabetic Vascular Complications

Centre for Experimental Medicine, School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Biomedical Science, Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast BT12 6BA, UK

Received 5 January 2015; Revised 23 April 2015; Accepted 27 April 2015

Academic Editor: Stefania Camastra

Copyright © 2015 Poojitha Rajasekar et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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