Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Journal of Diabetes Research
Volume 2015, Article ID 638205, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/638205
Research Article

A Qualitative Exploration of Motivation to Self-Manage and Styles of Self-Management amongst People Living with Type 2 Diabetes

1Centre for Positive Ageing, Faculty of Education and Health, University of Greenwich, London SE9 2UG, UK
2King’s College London, Division of Population and Patient Health, Social and Behavioural Sciences Group, Dental Institute, Guy’s Hospital, Floor 18 Guy’s Tower, Great Maze Pond, London SE1 9RW, UK

Received 25 November 2014; Revised 29 April 2015; Accepted 1 May 2015

Academic Editor: Ronald G. Tilton

Copyright © 2015 Paul Newton et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. R. M. Anderson, M. B. Donnelly, and R. F. Dedrick, “Measuring the attitudes of patients towards diabetes and its treatment,” Patient Education and Counseling, vol. 16, no. 3, pp. 231–245, 1990. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  2. A. Farmer, A.-L. Kinmonth, and S. Sutton, “Measuring beliefs about taking hypoglycaemic medication among people with Type 2 diabetes,” Diabetic Medicine, vol. 23, no. 3, pp. 265–270, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  3. S. Nam, C. Chesla, N. A. Stotts, L. Kroon, and S. L. Janson, “Barriers to diabetes management: patient and provider factors,” Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice, vol. 93, no. 1, pp. 1–9, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  4. P. J. O'Connor, B. F. Crabtree, and M. K. Yanoshik, “Differences between diabetic patients who do and do not respond to a diabetes care intervention: a qualitative analysis,” Family Medicine, vol. 29, no. 6, pp. 424–428, 1997. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  5. D. Kelleher, “Coming to terms with diabetes: coping strategies and non-compliance,” in Living with Chronic Illness, R. Anderson and M. Bury, Eds., Unwin Hyman, London, UK, 1988. View at Google Scholar
  6. H. M. Maclean, “Patterns of diet related self-care in diabetes,” Social Science & Medicine, vol. 32, no. 6, pp. 689–696, 1991. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  7. E. Ockleford, R. L. Shaw, J. Willars, and M. Dixon-Woods, “Education and self-management for people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes: a qualitative study of patients' views,” Chronic Illness, vol. 4, no. 1, pp. 28–37, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  8. R. Campbell, P. Pound, C. Pope et al., “Evaluating meta-ethnography: a synthesis of qualitative research on lay experiences of diabetes and diabetes care,” Social Science and Medicine, vol. 56, no. 4, pp. 671–684, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  9. M. M. Collins, C. P. Bradley, T. O'Sullivan, and I. J. Perry, “Self-care coping strategies in people with diabetes: a qualitative exploratory study,” BMC Endocrine Disorders, vol. 9, article 6, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  10. T. Gomersall, A. Madill, and L. K. M. Summers, “A metasynthesis of the self-management of type 2 diabetes,” Qualitative Health Research, vol. 21, no. 6, pp. 853–871, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  11. S. S. Rajaram, “Experience of hypoglycemia among insulin dependent diabetics and its impact on the family,” Sociology of Health & Illness, vol. 19, no. 3, pp. 281–296, 1997. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  12. L. M. Hunt, M. A. Valenzuela, and J. A. Pugh, “Porque me toco a mi? Mexican American diabetes patients' causal stories and their relationship to treatment behaviors,” Social Science & Medicine, vol. 46, no. 8, pp. 959–969, 1998. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  13. P. M. Trief, J. Sandberg, R. P. Greenberg et al., “Describing support: a qualitative study of couples living with diabetes,” Families, Systems & Health, vol. 21, no. 1, pp. 57–67, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  14. E. A. Beverly, B. A. Hultgren, K. M. Brooks, M. D. Ritholz, M. J. Abrahamson, and K. Weinger, “Understanding physicians' challenges when treating type 2 diabetic patients' social and emotional difficulties: a qualitative study,” Diabetes Care, vol. 34, no. 5, pp. 1086–1088, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  15. G. Guest, A. Bunce, and L. Johnson, “How many interviews are enough? An experiment with data saturation and variability,” Field Methods, vol. 18, no. 1, pp. 59–82, 2006. View at Google Scholar
  16. D. Silverman, Interpreting Qualitative Data: Methods for Analyzing Talk, Text and Interaction, Sage, London, UK, 2006.
  17. J. Richie and J. Lewis, Qualitative Research Practice: A Guide for Social Science Students and Researchers, Sage, London, UK, 2006.
  18. R. S. Barbour, “Checklists for improving rigour in qualitative research: a case of the tail wagging the dog?” British Medical Journal, vol. 322, no. 7294, pp. 1115–1117, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  19. S. Bourke and I. Burgman, “Coping with bullying in Australian schools: how children with disabilities experience support from friends, parents and teachers,” Disability & Society, vol. 25, pp. 359–371, 2010. View at Google Scholar
  20. M. Crouch and H. McKenzie, “The logic of small samples in interview-based qualitative research,” Social Science Information, vol. 45, no. 4, pp. 483–499, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  21. J. Green, “The use of focus groups in research into health,” in Researching Health: Qualitative, Quantitative and Mixed Methods, M. Saks and J. Allsop, Eds., Sage, London, UK, 2007. View at Google Scholar
  22. N. K.-C. Chan and A. C. Gillick, “Fatness as a disability: questions of personal and group identity,” Disability and Society, vol. 24, no. 2, pp. 231–243, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  23. S. Scambler, P. Newton, A. J. Sinclair, and K. Asimakopoulou, “Barriers and opportunities of empowerment as applied in diabetes settings: a focus on health care professionals' experiences,” Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice, vol. 97, no. 1, pp. e18–e22, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  24. K. Asimakopoulou, P. Newton, A. J. Sinclair, and S. Scambler, “Health care professionals' understanding and day-to-day practice of patient empowerment in diabetes; time to pause for thought?” Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice, vol. 95, no. 2, pp. 224–229, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  25. L. Spencer, J. Ritchie, and L. Dillo, Quality in Qualitative Evaluation: A Framework for Assessing Research Evidence, GCSRO, London, UK, 2003.
  26. J. Lawton, “Lay experiences of health and illness: past research and future agendas,” Sociology of Health and Illness, vol. 25, pp. 23–40, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  27. K. G. Asimakapoulou, “Empowerment in the management of diabetes: are we ready to test assumptions?” European Journal of Diabetes Nursing, vol. 4, no. 3, pp. 94–97, 2007. View at Google Scholar
  28. K. G. Asimakopoulou, P. Newton, and S. Scambler, “‘First do no harm’: the potential shortfalls of empowerment in diabetes,” European Diabetes Nursing, vol. 7, no. 2, pp. 79–81, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  29. P. Newton, K. Asimakopoulou, and S. Scambler, “Information seeking and use amongst people living with type 2 diabetes: an information continuum,” International Journal of Health Promotion and Education, vol. 50, no. 2, pp. 92–99, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus