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Journal of Diabetes Research
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 648239, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/648239
Review Article

Differential Effects of Leptin and Adiponectin in Endothelial Angiogenesis

1Division of Translational and Systems Medicine-Metabolic and Vascular Health, Warwick Medical School, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL, UK
2Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Birmingham Heartlands Hospital, Birmingham B9 5SS, UK

Received 17 November 2014; Accepted 22 December 2014

Academic Editor: Francis M. Finucane

Copyright © 2015 Raghu Adya et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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