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Journal of Diabetes Research
Volume 2015, Article ID 681612, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/681612
Review Article

Adipokines as Drug Targets in Diabetes and Underlying Disturbances

1Laboratory of Transplantation Immunobiology, Department of Immunology, Institute of Biomedical Sciences IV, University of São Paulo, SP, Brazil
2Laboratory of Clinical and Experimental Immunology, Nephrology Division, Federal University of São Paulo, SP, Brazil
3Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, MA, USA

Received 25 December 2014; Accepted 19 March 2015

Academic Editor: Raffaella Mastrocola

Copyright © 2015 Vinícius Andrade-Oliveira et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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