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Journal of Diabetes Research
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 1564386, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/1564386
Research Article

Swimming Exercise Alleviated Insulin Resistance by Regulating Tripartite Motif Family Protein 72 Expression and AKT Signal Pathway in Sprague-Dawley Rats Fed with High-Fat Diet

1College of Physical Education, Shanghai Normal University, Shanghai 200234, China
2Department of Food Science and Nutrition, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310053, China
3Rehabilitation College of Gannan Medical University, Jiangxi 341000, China
4College of Physical Education, Yangzhou University, Jiangsu 225009, China

Received 27 May 2016; Revised 14 August 2016; Accepted 3 October 2016

Academic Editor: Hassan Dashti

Copyright © 2016 Jie Qi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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