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Journal of Diabetes Research
Volume 2016, Article ID 1964634, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/1964634
Research Article

The Microtubule-Associated Protein Tau and Its Relevance for Pancreatic Beta Cells

1Department of Internal Medicine III, Division of Nephrology and Dialysis, Medical University of Vienna, 1090 Vienna, Austria
2Department of Laboratory Medicine, Medical University of Vienna, 1090 Vienna, Austria
3Institute of Neuroscience, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE4 5PL, UK

Received 11 November 2015; Accepted 24 November 2015

Academic Editor: Hiroshi Okamoto

Copyright © 2016 Magdalena Maj et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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