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Journal of Diabetes Research
Volume 2016, Article ID 2424306, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/2424306
Research Article

Large Gliadin Peptides Detected in the Pancreas of NOD and Healthy Mice following Oral Administration

1The Bartholin Institute, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen N, Denmark
2Clinical Biochemistry, Immunology & Genetics, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen S, Denmark
3The Hevesy Laboratory, DTU Nutech, Technical University of Denmark, Roskilde, Denmark
4Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague 6, Czech Republic
5Enzyme Purification and Characterization, Novozymes A/S, Bagsværd, Denmark

Received 6 May 2016; Accepted 10 August 2016

Academic Editor: Marco Songini

Copyright © 2016 Susanne W. Bruun et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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