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Journal of Diabetes Research
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 4712053, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/4712053
Research Article

Nanoparticle Delivered Human Biliverdin Reductase-Based Peptide Increases Glucose Uptake by Activating IRK/Akt/GSK3 Axis: The Peptide Is Effective in the Cell and Wild-Type and Diabetic Ob/Ob Mice

Department of Biophysics and Biochemistry, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, NY 14642, USA

Received 14 February 2016; Accepted 18 April 2016

Academic Editor: Pedro M. Geraldes

Copyright © 2016 Peter E. M. Gibbs et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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