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Journal of Diabetes Research
Volume 2017, Article ID 8379327, 30 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/8379327
Review Article

Diabetes-Induced Reactive Oxygen Species: Mechanism of Their Generation and Role in Renal Injury

Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, University of Louisiana at Monroe (ULM), Pharmacy Building, 1800 Bienville Dr., Monroe, LA 71201, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Keith E. Jackson; ude.mlu@noskcajk

Received 12 September 2016; Accepted 7 December 2016; Published 9 January 2017

Academic Editor: Carlos Martinez Salgado

Copyright © 2017 Selim Fakhruddin et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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