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Journal of Diabetes Research
Volume 2017, Article ID 9021314, 11 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/9021314
Review Article

Relationships between Bone Turnover and Energy Metabolism

1Instituto Superior de Ciências da Saúde Egas Moniz (ISCSEM), Campus Universitário-Quinta da Granja, 2829-511 Monte de Caparica, Portugal
2Centro de Investigação Interdisciplinar Egas Moniz (CiiEM), Campus Universitário-Quinta da Granja, 2829-511 Monte de Caparica, Portugal
3Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas Abel Salazar (ICBAS), Rua de Jorge Viterbo Ferreira, No. 228, 4050-313 Porto, Portugal

Correspondence should be addressed to Tânia A. P. Fernandes; moc.liamg@fpa.ainat

Received 23 March 2017; Revised 12 May 2017; Accepted 22 May 2017; Published 11 June 2017

Academic Editor: Toshiyasu Sasaoka

Copyright © 2017 Tânia A. P. Fernandes et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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