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Journal of Diabetes Research
Volume 2017, Article ID 9536025, 6 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/9536025
Research Article

Treatment Gaps Found in the Management of Type 2 Diabetes at a Community Health Centre in Johannesburg, South Africa

1Department of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, School of Therapeutic Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa
2Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa
3Carbohydrate and Lipid Metabolism Research Unit, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa

Correspondence should be addressed to Yacob Pinchevsky; moc.liamg@yksvehcnipj

Received 17 March 2017; Revised 18 August 2017; Accepted 12 September 2017; Published 10 October 2017

Academic Editor: Fabrizio Barbetti

Copyright © 2017 Yacob Pinchevsky et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Aims. The management of cardiometabolic goals or “ABCs” (HbA1c, blood pressure (BP), and cholesterol) ultimately determines the morbidity and mortality outcomes in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We sought to determine if patients with T2DM attending an urbanized public sector community health centre (CHC) were having their ABCs measured, were treated with appropriate cardioprotective agents and finally, were achieving guideline-based targets. Methods and Results. A cross-sectional record review of 519 patients was conducted between May and August 2015. The mean age was 54 years (SD: ±11.5) and 54% () were females. Testing of ABCs occurred in 68.8% () for HbA1c, 95.4% () for BP, and 58.6% () for LDL-C. Achievement of ABC targets was as follows: 19.3% (HbA1c < 7%), 22.0% (BP < 140/80 mmHg), and 56.3% (LDL-C < 2.5 mmol/l). Conclusion. There were a significant number of patients who were not tested nor received adequate pharmacotherapy or achieved their ABC targets. This places these patients at an increased risk for the development of diabetes-related complications. Although the realities of resource constraints exist in South Africa’s public sector settings, a wider implementation of evidence-based guidelines must be instituted in order to ensure better patient outcomes.