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Journal of Diabetes Research
Volume 2018 (2018), Article ID 5637130, 9 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/5637130
Research Article

Glomerular Filtration Rate and/or Ratio of Urine Albumin to Creatinine as Markers for Diabetic Retinopathy: A Ten-Year Follow-Up Study

1Ophthalmology Service, University Hospital Sant Joan, Institut de Investigacio Sanitaria Pere Virgili (IISPV), Universitat Rovira & Virgili, Reus, Spain
2Department of Computer Engineering and Mathematics, Universitat Rovira & Virgili, Reus, Spain
3Health Care Area Reus-Priorat, Institut Catala de la Salut (ICS), Institut de Investigació Sanitària Pere Virgili (IISPV), Universitat Rovira & Virgili, Reus, Spain
4Health Care Area Jordi Nadal de Salt (ICS), Unitat de Suport a la Recerca Barcelona Ciutat, Institut Universitari d’Investigacio en Atencio Primaria Jordi Gol (IDIAP Jordi Gol), Barcelona, Spain
5Unitat de Suport a la Recerca Barcelona Ciutat, Institut Universitari d’Investigacio en Atencio Primaria Jordi Gol (IDIAP Jordi Gol), Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra, Spain

Correspondence should be addressed to Pedro Romero-Aroca; moc.liamg@ereporemor

Received 13 November 2017; Revised 20 December 2017; Accepted 26 December 2017; Published 26 February 2018

Academic Editor: Marco Songini

Copyright © 2018 Pedro Romero-Aroca et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Aims. To determine the relationship between diabetic nephropathy and diabetic retinopathy on a population of type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. Methods. A prospective ten-year follow-up population-based study. We determined differences between estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) using the chronic kidney disease epidemiology collaboration equation and urine albumin to creatinine ratio. Results. Annual incidence of any-DR was 8.21 ± 0.60% (7.06%–8.92%), sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy (STDR) was 2.65 ± 0.14% (2.48%–2.88%), and diabetic macular edema (DME) was 2.21 ± 0.18% (2%–2.49%). Renal study results were as follows: UACR > 30 mg/g had an annual incidence of 7.02 ± 0.05% (6.97%–7.09%), eGFR < 60 ml/min/1.73 m2 incidence was 5.89 ± 0.12% (5.70%–6.13%). Cox’s proportional regression analysis of DR incidence shows that renal function studied by eGFR < 60 ml/min/1.73 m2 was less significant (, HR 1.223, 1.098–1.201) than UACR ≥ 300 mg/g (, HR 1.485, 1.103–1.548). The study of STDR shows that eGFR < 60 ml/min/1.73 m2 was significant (, HR 1.890, 1.267–2.820), UACR ≥ 300 mg/g (, HR 2.448, 1.595–3.757), and DME shows that eGFR < 60 ml/min/1.73 m2 was significant (, HR 1.920, 1.287–2.864) and UACR ≥ 300 mg/g (, HR 2.432, 1.584–3.732). Conclusions. The UACR has a better association with diabetic retinopathy than the eGFR, although both are important risk factors for diabetic retinopathy.