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Journal of Environmental and Public Health
Volume 2009 (2009), Article ID 320372, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2009/320372
Research Article

The Contribution of Home, Neighbourhood and School Environmental Factors in Explaining Physical Activity among Adolescents

1Research Foundation-Flanders, Department of Movement and Sports Sciences, Ghent University, Belgium
2Department of Movement and Sports Sciences, Ghent University, Belgium
3Department of Public Health, Ghent University, Belgium

Received 3 December 2008; Revised 15 July 2009; Accepted 11 August 2009

Academic Editor: Richard Grimes

Copyright © 2009 Leen Haerens et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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