Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Journal of Environmental and Public Health
Volume 2009 (2009), Article ID 891754, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2009/891754
Research Article

Subjective Risk Assessment and Perception in the Greek and English Bakery Industries

1Department of Public Health, Medical School, University of Patras, 26500 Patras, Greece
2School of Environment & Life Sciences, University of Salford, Manchester M5 4WT, UK
3Department of Hygiene and Epidemiology, Medical School, University of Athens, 11527 Athens, Greece
4Department of Production and Management Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Demokritos University of Thrace, 67100 Xanthi, Greece

Received 19 April 2009; Revised 10 August 2009; Accepted 25 September 2009

Academic Editor: Issam Al-Khatib

Copyright © 2009 Evangelos C. Alexopoulos et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. O. Renn, “Perception of risks,” Toxicology Letters, vol. 149, no. 1–3, pp. 405–413, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at PubMed
  2. J. F. Short Jr., “The social fabric at risk: toward the social transformation of risk analysis,” American Sociological Review, vol. 49, no. 6, pp. 711–725, 1984. View at Google Scholar
  3. M. Douglas and A. Wildavsky, Risk and Culture: An Analysis of the Selection of Technological Dangers, University of California Press, Berkeley, Calif, USA, 1982.
  4. S. Bastide, J.-P. Moatti, J.-P. Pages, and F. Fagnani, “Risk perception and social acceptability of technologies: the french case,” Risk Analysis, vol. 9, no. 2, pp. 215–223, 1989. View at Google Scholar
  5. C. F. Keown, “Risk perceptions in Hong Kongese vs. Americans,” Risk Analysis, vol. 9, no. 3, pp. 401–405, 1989. View at Google Scholar
  6. R. R. Kleinhesselink and E. A. Rosa, “Cognitive representation of risk perceptions: a comparison of Japan and the United States,” Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, vol. 22, pp. 11–28, 1991. View at Google Scholar
  7. A. Ben-Ari and Y. Lavee, “Cultural orientation, ethnic affiliation, and negative daily occurrences: a multidimensional cross-cultural analysis,” American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, vol. 74, no. 2, pp. 102–111, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at PubMed
  8. F. J. van de Vijver and K. Leung, “Personality in cultural context: methodological issues,” Journal of Personality, vol. 69, no. 6, pp. 1007–1031, 2001. View at Google Scholar
  9. E. K. Osei, G. E. A. Amoh, and C. Schandorf, “Risk ranking by perception,” Health Physics, vol. 72, no. 2, pp. 195–203, 1997. View at Google Scholar
  10. H. Granot, “The human factor in industrial disaster,” Disaster Prevention and Management, vol. 7, no. 2, pp. 92–102, 1998. View at Google Scholar
  11. L. Sjöberg, “Worry and risk perception,” Risk Analysis, vol. 18, no. 1, pp. 85–93, 1998. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  12. C. Smallman, “Risk and organisational behaviour: a research model,” Disaster Prevention and Management, vol. 5, pp. 12–26, 1996. View at Google Scholar
  13. R. Lofstedt and L. Frewer, Risk and Modern Society, Earthscan Publications, London, UK, 1998.
  14. Y. J. Frank, Risk Taking Behaviour, John wiley & Sons, New York, NY, USA, 1994.
  15. S. Cox and R. Tait, Safety, Reliability & Risk Management: An Integrated Approach, Reed Educational and Professional Publishing, Oxford, UK, 2nd edition, 1998.
  16. S. Lewinsohn and H. Mano, “Multiattribute choice and affect: the influence of naturally occurring and manipulated moods on choice processes,” Journal of Behavioural Decision-Making, vol. 6, pp. 33–51, 1993. View at Google Scholar
  17. H. Mano, “Risk-taking, framing effects, and affect,” Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, vol. 57, no. 1, pp. 38–58, 1994. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  18. O. Renn and B. Rohrmann, Cross-Cultural Risk Perception. A Survey of Research Results, Kluwer Academic Publishers, New York, NY, USA, 2000.
  19. B. Rohrmann and H. Chen, “Risk perception in China and Australia: an exploratory crosscultural study,” Journal of Risk Research, vol. 2, pp. 219–241, 1999. View at Google Scholar
  20. P. Brown, “Qualitative methods in environmental health research,” Environmental Health Perspectives, vol. 111, no. 14, pp. 1789–1798, 2003. View at Google Scholar
  21. B. DiCicco-Bloom and B. F. Crabtree, “The qualitative research interview,” Medical Education, vol. 40, no. 4, pp. 314–321, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at PubMed
  22. L. Gibbs, M. Kealy, K. Willis, J. Green, N. Welch, and J. Daly, “What have sampling and data collection got to do with good qualitative research?” Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, vol. 31, no. 6, pp. 540–544, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at PubMed
  23. P. Huston and P. Huston, “Qualitative studies: their role in medical research,” Canadian Family Physician, vol. 44, no. 5, pp. 2453–2458, 1998. View at Google Scholar
  24. K. Malterud, “Qualitative research: standards, challenges, and guidelines,” The Lancet, vol. 358, no. 9280, pp. 483–488, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at PubMed
  25. A. Agresti, Categorical Data Analysis, John Wiley & Sons, Hoboken, NJ, USA, 2nd edition, 2002.
  26. D. Hosmer and S. Lemeshow, Applied Logistic Regression, John Wiley & Sons, Hoboken, NJ, USA, 2nd edition, 2000.
  27. A. Rencher, Methods of Multivariate Analysis, John Wiley & Sons, Hoboken, NJ, USA, 2nd edition, 2002.
  28. G. Hofstede, Culture's Consequences, Sage, Beverly Hills, Calif, USA, 1980.
  29. G. Hofstede and G. J. Hofstede, Culture and Organisations, McGraw-Hill, New York, NY, USA, 1997.
  30. R. N. Bontempo, W. P. Bottom, and E. U. Weber, “Cross-cultural differences in risk perception: a model-based approach,” Risk Analysis, vol. 17, no. 4, pp. 479–488, 1997. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  31. S. M. Shah and B. A. Silverstein, “Preparing employers to implement the Washington State ergonomics rule: evaluation of the training workshops,” Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene, vol. 1, no. 7, pp. 448–455, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at PubMed
  32. V. G. Duffy, “Effects of training and experience on perception of hazard and risk,” Ergonomics, vol. 46, no. 1–3, pp. 114–125, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  33. A. Adams, S. Bochner, and L. Bilik, “The effectiveness of warning signs in hazardous work places: cognitive and social determinants,” Applied Ergonomics, vol. 29, no. 4, pp. 247–254, 1998. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  34. S. Frosdick, “The techniques of risk analysis are insufficient in themselves,” Disaster Prevention and Management, vol. 6, no. 3, pp. 165–177, 1997. View at Google Scholar
  35. J. Barnett and G. M. Breakwell, “Risk perception and experience: hazard personality profiles and individual differences,” Risk Analysis, vol. 21, no. 1, pp. 171–177, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  36. L. Sjöberg, “Factors in risk perception,” Risk Analysis, vol. 20, no. 1, pp. 1–11, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  37. R. E. Nisbett and T. Masuda, “Culture and point of view,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 100, no. 19, pp. 11163–11170, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at PubMed
  38. M. Siegrist and G. Cvetkovich, “Perception of hazards: the role of social trust and knowledge,” Risk Analysis, vol. 20, no. 5, pp. 713–719, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  39. M. J. Viklund, “Trust and risk perception in western Europe: a cross-national study,” Risk Analysis, vol. 23, no. 4, pp. 727–738, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  40. N. Holmes and S. M. Gifford, “Narratives of risk in occupational health and safety: why the “good” boss blames his tradesman and the “good” tradesman blames his tools,” Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, vol. 21, no. 1, pp. 11–16, 1997. View at Google Scholar
  41. E. U. Weber and C. K. Hsee, “Models and mosaics: investigating cross-cultural differences in risk perception and risk preference,” Psychonomic Bulletin and Review, vol. 6, no. 4, pp. 611–617, 1999. View at Google Scholar
  42. L. M. Franco, S. Bennett, R. Kanfer, and P. Stubblebine, “Determinants and consequences of health worker motivation in hospitals in Jordan and Georgia,” Social Science and Medicine, vol. 58, no. 2, pp. 343–355, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  43. A. Sumrow, “Motivation: a new look at an age-old topic,” Radiology Management, vol. 25, no. 5, pp. 44–47, 2003. View at Google Scholar
  44. J. S. Eccles and A. Wigfield, “Motivational beliefs, values, and goals,” Annual Review of Psychology, vol. 53, pp. 109–132, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at PubMed
  45. J. A. Colquitt, J. A. LePine, and R. A. Noe, “Toward an integrative theory of training motivation: a meta-analytic path analysis of 20 years of research,” Journal of Applied Psychology, vol. 85, no. 5, pp. 678–707, 2000. View at Google Scholar