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Journal of Environmental and Public Health
Volume 2009, Article ID 957023, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2009/957023
Research Article

OccIDEAS: Retrospective Occupational Exposure Assessment in Community-Based Studies Made Easier

1Western Australian Institute for Medical Research, University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia 6012, Australia
2Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7360, USA
3Monash Centre for Occupational and Environmental Health, Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria 3004, Australia
4Data Scientists Pty Ltd, Sunshine Coast, Queensland 4560, Australia

Received 6 February 2009; Revised 14 June 2009; Accepted 31 August 2009

Academic Editor: Gary M. Marsh

Copyright © 2009 Lin Fritschi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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