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Journal of Environmental and Public Health
Volume 2010 (2010), Article ID 213960, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/213960
Research Article

Inhalation Exposures to Particulate Matter and Carbon Monoxide during Ethiopian Coffee Ceremonies in Addis Ababa: A Pilot Study

1Department of the Environment and Sustainability, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, OH 43403, USA
2Department of Public and Allied Health, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, OH 43403, USA
3School of Public Health, College of Health Sciences, Addis Ababa University, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

Received 28 January 2010; Revised 7 June 2010; Accepted 1 September 2010

Academic Editor: Chit Ming Wong

Copyright © 2010 Chris Keil et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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