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Journal of Environmental and Public Health
Volume 2011, Article ID 202783, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/202783
Research Article

Administrative Censoring in Ecological Analyses of Autism and a Bayesian Solution

1Program in Public Health and Department of Statistics, University of California, Irvine, 2241 Bren Hall, Irvine, CA 92697-1250, USA
2Gradient, Seattle, WA 98101-1248, USA
3Department of Health and Nutrition Sciences, Brooklyn College, Brooklyn, NY 11210, USA

Received 22 September 2010; Accepted 2 March 2011

Academic Editor: Pam R. Factor-Litvak

Copyright © 2011 Scott M. Bartell and Thomas A. Lewandowski. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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