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Journal of Environmental and Public Health
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 597073, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/597073
Research Article

Risk Factors for Colonization of E. coli in Atlantic Bottlenose Dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) in the Indian River Lagoon, Florida

1Marine Mammal Research and Conservation Program, Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute, Florida Atlantic University, Ft. Pierce, FL 34946, USA
2Georgia Aquarium, Atlanta, GA 30313, USA
3Center for Coastal Environmental Health and Biomolecular Research, NOS, NOAA, Charleston, SC 29142, USA
4Department of Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80532, USA

Received 9 June 2011; Revised 2 August 2011; Accepted 3 August 2011

Academic Editor: Pam R. Factor-Litvak

Copyright © 2011 Adam M. Schaefer et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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