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Journal of Environmental and Public Health
Volume 2012, Article ID 101850, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/101850
Clinical Study

Evaluation of a Bladder Cancer Cluster in a Population of Criminal Investigators with the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives—Part 1: The Cancer Incidence

1Federal Occupational Health, Department of Health and Human Services, 4550 Montgomery Avenue, Suite 950, Bethesda, MD 20814, USA
2Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 615 N. Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA

Received 24 August 2012; Accepted 22 October 2012

Academic Editor: Edward Trapido

Copyright © 2012 Susan R. Davis et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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