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Journal of Environmental and Public Health
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 185731, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/185731
Clinical Study

Human Excretion of Bisphenol A: Blood, Urine, and Sweat (BUS) Study

1Faculty of Medicine, University of Alberta, 2935-66 Street, Edmonton, AB, Canada T6K 4C1
2Department of Laboratory Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada T6G 2B7
3Environmental Division, ALS Laboratory Group, Edmonton AB, Canada T6E 5C1
4Department of Family Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada T6G 2C8

Received 16 July 2011; Revised 10 September 2011; Accepted 26 September 2011

Academic Editor: Robin Bernhoft

Copyright © 2012 Stephen J. Genuis et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Background. Bisphenol A (BPA) is an ubiquitous chemical contaminant that has recently been associated with adverse effects on human health. There is incomplete understanding of BPA toxicokinetics, and there are no established interventions to eliminate this compound from the human body. Using 20 study participants, this study was designed to assess the relative concentration of BPA in three body fluids—blood, urine, and sweat—and to determine whether induced sweating may be a therapeutic intervention with potential to facilitate elimination of this compound. Methods. Blood, urine, and sweat were collected from 20 individuals (10 healthy participants and 10 participants with assorted health problems) and analyzed for various environmental toxicants including BPA. Results. BPA was found to differing degrees in each of blood, urine, and sweat. In 16 of 20 participants, BPA was identified in sweat, even in some individuals with no BPA detected in their serum or urine samples. Conclusions. Biomonitoring of BPA through blood and/or urine testing may underestimate the total body burden of this potential toxicant. Sweat analysis should be considered as an additional method for monitoring bioaccumulation of BPA in humans. Induced sweating appears to be a potential method for elimination of BPA.