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Journal of Environmental and Public Health
Volume 2012, Article ID 378165, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/378165
Research Article

Heterogeneity in Past Year Cigarette Smoking Quit Attempts among Latinos

1School of Nursing, University of Medicine & Dentistry of New Jersey, 65 Bergen Street, Room GA-225, Newark, NJ 07101-2012, USA
2Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Medicine & Dentistry of New Jersey, 683 Hoes Lane West, Piscataway‚ NJ 08854, USA
3Department of Health Education and Behavioral Science, School of Public Health, University of Medicine & Dentistry of New Jersey, 683 Hoes Lane West, Piscataway, NJ 08854, USA
4Department of Community Health and Health Behavior, School of Public Health and Health Professions, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York, 310 Kimball Tower, Buffalo, NY 14214-8028, USA
5Department of Biostatistics, School of Public Health, University of Medicine & Dentistry of New Jersey, 683 Hoes Lane West, Piscataway, NJ 08854, USA

Received 2 December 2011; Revised 6 March 2012; Accepted 6 March 2012

Academic Editor: Lorraine Greaves

Copyright © 2012 Daniel A. Gundersen et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Objective. Examine the association between English language proficiency (ELP) and immigrant generation and having made a cigarette smoking quit attempt in the past 12 months among Latinos. Examine if gender moderates the association between acculturation and quit attempts. Methods. Latino past year smokers from the 2003 and 2006/07 Tobacco Use Supplement to the Current Population Survey were analyzed. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between quit attempt and ELP and immigrant generation, controlling for demographics and smoking characteristics. Results. Latinos with poor ELP were more likely to have made a quit attempt compared to those with good ELP (adjusted odds ratio [ A O R ] = 1 . 2 2 , confidence interval [CI]: 1.02–1.46) after controlling for demographic and smoking characteristics. First ( A O R = 1 . 2 1 , CI: 1.02–1.43) and second generation immigrants ( A O R = 1 . 3 6 , CI: 1.12–1.64) were more likely than third generation immigrants to have made a quit attempt in the past 12 months. Conclusion. Quit behaviors are shaped by differences in language ability and generational status among Latinos. This underscores the need to disaggregate Latinos beyond racial/ethnic categories to identify subgroup differences relevant for smoking and smoking cessation behaviors in this population.