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Journal of Environmental and Public Health
Volume 2014, Article ID 132057, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/132057
Review Article

An Approach to Developing Local Climate Change Environmental Public Health Indicators, Vulnerability Assessments, and Projections of Future Impacts

1Biositu, LLC, 505D W Alabama Street Houston, TX 77006, USA
2California Department of Public Health, Environmental Health Investigations Branch, 850 Marina Bay Parkway, Richmond, CA 94804, USA

Received 16 July 2014; Accepted 16 September 2014; Published 30 September 2014

Academic Editor: Pam R. Factor-Litvak

Copyright © 2014 Adele Houghton and Paul English. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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