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Journal of Environmental and Public Health
Volume 2014, Article ID 542123, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/542123
Research Article

Relationship between Objectively Measured Walkability and Exercise Walking among Adults with Diabetes

1Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University at Albany School of Public Health, One University Place, Rensselaer, NY 12144, USA
2Department of Health Policy, Management and Behavior, University at Albany School of Public Health, One University Place, Rensselaer, NY 12144, USA
3New York New Jersey Preparedness and Emergency Response Learning Center, University at Albany School of Public Health, One University Place, Rensselaer, NY 12144, USA
4AIDS Institute, New York State Department of Health, Corning Tower, Empire State Plaza, Albany, NY 12222, USA

Received 10 January 2014; Accepted 3 March 2014; Published 26 March 2014

Academic Editor: Pam R. Factor-Litvak

Copyright © 2014 Akiko S. Hosler et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Little is known about the relationship between objectively measured walkability and walking for exercise among adults with diabetes. Information regarding walking behavior of adults with diabetes residing in 3 Upstate New York counties was collected through an interview survey. Walkability measures were collected through an environmental audit of a sample of street segments. Overall walkability and 4 subgroup measures of walkability were aggregated at the ZIP level. Multivariate logistic regression was used for analysis. Study participants were 61.0% female, 56.7% non-Hispanic White, and 35.1% African-American, with a mean age of 62.0 years. 108 participants (51.9%) walked for exercise on community streets, and 62 (29.8%) met the expert-recommended level of walking for ≥150 minutes/week. After adjustment for age, gender, race/ethnicity, education, BMI, physical impairment, and social support for exercise, walking any minutes/week was associated with traffic safety (OR 1.34, 95% CI 1.15–1.65). Walking ≥150 minutes/week was associated with overall walkability of the community (2.65, 1.22, and 5.74), as well as sidewalks (1.73, 1.12–2.67), street amenity (2.04, 1.12–3.71), and traffic safety (1.92, 1.02–3.72). This study suggests that walkability of the community should be an integral part of the socioecologic approach to increase physical activity among adults with diabetes.