Journal of Environmental and Public Health / 2014 / Article / Tab 2

Research Article

Relationship between Objectively Measured Walkability and Exercise Walking among Adults with Diabetes

Table 2

Sociodemographics, health status, physical activity, and community walkability of the study population.

Characteristic Total sample ( )

Age, mean (SD)62.0 (14.7)
Female, (%)127 (61.1)
Race/ethnicity, (%)
 Non-Hispanic White118 (56.7)
 Non-Hispanic Black 73 (35.1)
 Hispanic 5 (2.4)
 American Indian 4 (1.9)
 Other 8 (3.8)
Education, (%)
 Less than high school51 (24.5)
 High school graduate70 (33.7)
 Some college or higher 87 (41.8)
Body mass index, mean (SD)32.0 (6.9)
Having any impairment that affects physical
activity, (%)
131 (63.0)
Type of impairment (multiple responses), (%)
 Muscular/skeletal 95 (45.7)
 Pulmonary18 (8.7)
 Neurological 11 (5.3)
 Cardiovascular11 (5.3)
 Vision/hearing10 (4.8)
 Other 25 (12.0)
Social support for exercise, mean (SD)*2.35 (1.60)
Physical activity in the previous month, (%)
 Walked in the community for exercise,
 any minutes/week
108 (51.9)
 Walked in the community for exercise,
 ≥150 min/week
62 (29.8)
Community’s walkability measures, mean
 Overall walkability2.39 (0.57)
 Sidewalks2.31 (0.99)
 Traffic safety2.31 (0.28)
 Street amenity2.11 (0.73)
 Upkeep3.09 (0.37)

A composite variable for having a friend, spouse, or child exercises with you. 1: not at all; 5: great deal.
Summary measures of walkability in the 1–4 scale, with 4 as the most desirable feature.