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Journal of Environmental and Public Health
Volume 2017, Article ID 3407325, 16 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/3407325
Review Article

An Approach to Developing Local Climate Change Environmental Public Health Indicators in a Rural District

1Biositu, LLC, 505D W Alabama St., Houston, TX 77006, USA
2Green River District Health Department, 1501 Breckenridge Street, Owensboro, KY 42303, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Adele Houghton; moc.utisoib@heleda

Received 10 September 2016; Revised 29 December 2016; Accepted 1 February 2017; Published 2 March 2017

Academic Editor: Pam R. Factor-Litvak

Copyright © 2017 Adele Houghton et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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