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Journal of Environmental and Public Health
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 3506949, 12 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/3506949
Research Article

Horizontal and Vertical Distribution of Heavy Metals in Farm Produce and Livestock around Lead-Contaminated Goldmine in Dareta and Abare, Zamfara State, Northern Nigeria

1Toxicology Unit, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Port Harcourt, Rivers State, Nigeria
2National Veterinary Research Institute, Vom, Nigeria
3Department of Medical Laboratory Science, Faculty of Science, Rivers State University of Science and Technology, Port Harcourt, Rivers State, Nigeria

Correspondence should be addressed to O. E. Orisakwe

Received 28 December 2016; Accepted 6 April 2017; Published 2 May 2017

Academic Editor: Evelyn O. Talbott

Copyright © 2017 O. E. Orisakwe et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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