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Journal of Environmental and Public Health
Volume 2017, Article ID 5120504, 27 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/5120504
Research Article

Black Tea Source, Production, and Consumption: Assessment of Health Risks of Fluoride Intake in New Zealand

1EnviroManagement Services, 11 Riverview, Dohertys Rd, Bandon, Co. Cork P72 YF10, Ireland
2Bay of Plenty Environmental Health Clinic, 1416A Cameron Road, Tauranga 3012, New Zealand
3Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto, 124 Edward Street, Toronto, ON, Canada M5G 1G6
4Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, KEH M2225, University of Tulsa, Tulsa, OK, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Declan T. Waugh; ei.orivne@nalced

Received 23 December 2016; Revised 25 April 2017; Accepted 18 May 2017; Published 21 June 2017

Academic Editor: Pam R. Factor-Litvak

Copyright © 2017 Declan T. Waugh et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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